Democratic Control

Democratic Control

Democratic Control over the Security Sector

Defence Institution Building in Ukraine at Peace and at War

Polyakov, Leonid. "Defence Institution Building in Ukraine at Peace and at War." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 17, no. 3 (2018): 92-108.

Introduction

In 1991, independent Ukraine inherited from the Soviet Union sizeable conventional military contingent equivalent to Europe’s second largest armed forces and had on its territory the third world largest nuclear arsenal.[1] The process of conversion of this rather chaotic massive post-Soviet force and building the coherent national military of Ukraine went through two major stages – peace-time decline (1991-2013) and war-time transformation since the start of Russian invasion to Crimea in 2014.

17.3.07_polyakov_dib_ukraine.pdf — Downloaded 15 times

Defense Institution Building from Above? Lessons from the Baltic Experience

Chinchilla, Alexandra C., and Paul Poast. "Defense Institution Building from Above? Lessons from the Baltic Experience." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 17, no. 3 (2018): 61-71.

Introduction

There is nothing better than ‘NATO dirt’ under the ‘fingernails.’ So said then NATO Supreme allied commander in Europe, General John Shalikashvili, in reference to the goal of the Partnership for Peace (PfP).[1] In the aftermath of the Cold War, the states of Eastern Europe looked for aid from the West. The Partnership for Peace (PfP) was NATO’s response. The goal was to bring members of the former Warsaw Pact into closer cooperation with NATO.

Defense Institution Building in the U.S. Context

Kerr, Alexandra. "Defense Institution Building in the U.S. Context." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 17, no. 3 (2018): 23-38.

The United States has been in the business of assisting partner nations’ militaries for decades. The original security assistance framework that was first developed in the 1960s, however, has proven insufficient to keep up with the demands of the 21st century security environment. As such, the broader U.S.

17.3.02_kerr_dib_us_context.pdf — Downloaded 14 times

NATO’s Defense Institution Building and Projecting Stability: Current Priorities and Activities

Bin, Alberto. "NATO’s Defense Institution Building and Projecting Stability: Current Priorities and Activities." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 17, no. 3 (2018): 8-22.

Introduction

If our neighbours are more stable, we are more secure.” This statement,[1] made by the NATO Heads of State and Government at their 2016 Summit in Warsaw, touches upon the core of NATO’s work on Projecting Stability. However, efforts aimed at “projecting stability” are not easy to contextualize and conceptualize – ‘stability’ may carry different connotations depending on the circumstances.

The Persistent Demand for Defense Institution Building

Fluri, Philipp, and Judith Reid. "The Persistent Demand for Defense Institution Building." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 17, no. 3 (2018): 5-7.

Transparent and accountable, efficient and effective Defense Institution Building (DIB) is one of the shared values that binds together not only NATO but also NATO’s Partnership Programming. In this way, DIB is also an essential part of defense management and reform.

17.3.00_editorial.pdf — Downloaded 53 times

Key Prerequisites for Integrity in Defence - Role of Parliament

Tagarev, Todor. Key Prerequisites for Integrity in Defence - Role of Parliament In CSDM Views. Sofia: Centre for Security and Defence Management, 2015.

In this short presentation to the distinguished audience of parliamentarians and representatives of national governments and international organisations I will outline the key prerequisites for integrity in defence and the respective attitude of parliamentarians and parliaments, which may have a positive or a negative impact on defence integrity. For a change, I will not use the word corruption, underlining that integrity means much more than the opposite of “corruption.”

Pages