Defence policy

Defence policy

Defence policy: scope, components, levels of ambition

Pandemics and Armed Forces: Which Roles Are Appropriate?

Clarke, John L.. "Pandemics and Armed Forces: Which Roles Are Appropriate?" Connections: The Quarterly Journal 19, no. 2 (2020): 77-88.

The Military’s Response to Pandemic Disease

The Covid-19 crisis has caused leaders in all affected countries to turn to their armed forces for support in an ever-expanding range of roles. Armed forces are being tasked to provide capabilities that, in many instances, go beyond what they have provided in past crises. It must be expected that these demands will continue to mount even as the current crisis abates, as the pandemic is expected to remain a top national concern for months to come.

Balancing Defense and Civil Support Tasks: The Impact of Covid-19 on the Bulgarian Military’s Roles

Tagarev, Todor. "Balancing Defense and Civil Support Tasks: The Impact of Covid-19 on the Bulgarian Military’s Roles." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 19, no. 2 (2020): 61-76.

Introduction

The Bulgarian armed forces, just like the armed forces in many other countries, have three main roles: defense of the sovereignty and the national territory, contribution to international peace and security, and contribution to internal security, particularly in times of crises. In peacetime, the third of these roles is most visible to society. The military contribution during the Covid-19 pandemic makes no exception.

Initial Exploitation of Natural Language Processing Techniques on NATO Strategy and Policies

Beyond Punishment: Deterrence in the Digital Realm

Kerttunen, Mika. "Beyond Punishment: Deterrence in the Digital Realm." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 18, no. 1 (2019): 61-68.

he Comfortable Laziness of Deterrence Theory

Can anything new and meaningful be said of deterrence? Not necessarily starting from Hermocrates of Syracuse, any analysis of deterrence has at least to notice that deterrence, narrowly understood, refers to a threat of punishment.[1] At the same, it should be noted that a wider reading acknowledges two aspects of deterrence: punishment and denial.

18.1.04_deterrence_cyber.pdf — Downloaded 167 times

Deterrence and Defense at the Eastern Flank of NATO and the EU: Readiness and Interoperability in the Context of Forward Presence

Shalamanov, Velizar, Pavel Anastasov, and Georgi Tsvetkov. "Deterrence and Defense at the Eastern Flank of NATO and the EU: Readiness and Interoperability in the Context of Forward Presence." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 18, no. 1 (2019): 25-42.

NATO Presence in Eastern Europe after the Changes of 1989 [1]

The elaboration in this article is based on developments of multinational formations in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE)/South Eastern Europe (SEE), improving their interoperability and readiness through multinational projects, especially in the area of Communications and Information (C&I), and adequate education and training, including exercises.

18.1.02_deterrence_eastern_flank.pdf — Downloaded 242 times

Theory and Current Practice of Deterrence in International Security

Tagarev, Todor. "Theory and Current Practice of Deterrence in International Security." Connections: The Quarterly Journal 18, no. 1 (2019): 5-10.

Deterrence has been practiced over the centuries to dissuade an opponent considering a coercive course of action, e.g., an armed attack. The concept became subject of rigorous debates with the advent of the nuclear weapons. By the 1960s, the works by Bernard Brodie,[1] Herman Kahn,[2] Glenn H. Snyder,[3] Thomas C.

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